• Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the process for applying for a zoning permit?

    All requests for a Zoning Permit must consist of the appropriate completed application form (contact the Planner of the Day to determine which Zoning Permit type is appropriate for your project), five copies of a plat of survey drawn to scale, and the required fee (Fee Information). After-the-fact requests will be charged double the required permit fee.  Additional supporting materials (Grading/Drainage Plan, Cost Estimate - Non-Conforming Use and Structure EAV, Cost Estimate Non Conforming Structural Members, Vegetation Plan, Erosion Control Plan, etc.)  may be required for certain projects.  New residences also require the submittal of the Sanitary Permit Number (Septic Systems), Soil Borings, and two sets of Building Plans. All projects (except new construction) must also receive Preliminary Site Evaluation (PSE) approval from the Environmental Health Division (EHD) of the Department of Parks and Land Use, which may be up to a two-week process (Permit Guide), unless the site is served with municipal sewer. Applications (Zoning Permit) shall be completed in their entirety. Completed applications shall be submitted to the Planning and Zoning Division. If the zoning permit is approved, it is mailed to the Town Building Inspector upon receipt of the PSE approval from the EHD. If the site is served with municipal sewer, the zoning permit will be issued to the Building Inspector within a few days. For most projects, the Building Inspector will require a Building Permit, and you should always check with your local municipality (Municipal Contacts) regarding the need for permits, in addition to contacting the County.  If you are conducting grading activities, you may also need to secure an Erosion Control Permit from the Town Building Inspector and/or a Storm Water Permit from the Land Resources Division of the Department of Parks and Land Use. You have six (6) months to begin your project and 18 months to complete your project unless otherwise noted. If your permit is denied, you may appeal the denial through the Board of Adjustment procedure (Variance or Special Exception). Excessive grading requests may require a Conditional Use Permit (Conditional Use Permit) and Department of Natural Resources (DNR) review. The DNR approves all Shoreland Stabilization Structures (rip rap seawall) requests, however, the County no longer issues a permit for rip rap structures.